Week Twenty-Four

Bishopsteignton Lockdown Diary

This week’s Coronavirus related news. Lockdown measures being increased by the Government in the face of the returning numbers of covid 19 cases.

Thoughts and feelings of the village as it faced the twenty-third, and looks forward to the twenty-fourth week since lockdown was announced. Logged in visitors can post their comments below.

While responses to the Coronavirus Lockdown continue to develop over the coming weeks, we still want to record thoughts and actions in Bishopsteignton. Please leave two or three sentences and any images you may have in the comments section below.

News since the previous article

Warnings from scientists as UK Covid cases continue to rise

Surge in UK coronavirus infections

UK coronavirus testing system struggles to meet demand

Government reverses decision to lift coronavirus restrictions in Bolton and Trafford

Quarantine restrictions for travellers from Greece

Lecturers fear coronavirus ‘disaster’ ahead of university return

Covid warning as a million students set for uni return

New coronavirus restrictions imposed in North West England

UK tourists face new quarantine deadline race

Levels of depression have doubled during coronavirus pandemic

Confirmed Global coronavirus cases pass 21 Million

A-level anger, homelessness fears and self-employed help

Various posts on social media by local businesses and organisations made since our last post

The Ring of Bells

www.facebook.com/theringersinbishopsteignton/posts/642685519708631

The Old Commercial

www.facebook.com/oldcommercialinn/posts/1160722904303072

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One Reply to “Week Twenty-Four”

  1. Well, oddly enough, increasing the allowable group meeting size (two households of any size have been allowed to meet indoors or outdoors, or up to six people from different households outdoors, police have had no powers to stop gatherings unless they exceeded thirty), opening shops, pubs, restaurants, hairdressers etc, encouraging people to go to pubs and restaurants (“Eat out to help out”) and back to the workplace and the return to national and international recreational travel has resulted in a significant rise in the number of cases of Covid 19.

    Increased complacency amongst the freer public and blatant flouting of the somewhat optimistic (and confusing rules) largely by, but by no means exclusive to, younger adults has also had a contributory affect. No surprise – having been given the responsibility of looking after their own and other people’s health and safety individuals are making up their own minds as to what rules it suits them to follow.

    The reported numbers are not just rising due to increased testing – the percentage of positive tests is increasing. Nationally and internationally.

    Unfortunately these ‘easings’ have been taking place faster than it is possible to gather data as to the effect they might be having, so when negative results do eventually come to light they have to be reversed as per tonight’s Government announcement.

    This in the week schools go back and the week before the nation’s colleges and universities return to service. For the autumn term. Going into winter. The respiratory virus season.

    There is still no vaccine and although some treatments have been found to reduce the percentage of deaths (25% for a particular steroid treatment) they are by no means a guarantee of a full or even partial recovery.

    We are still learning about the longterm effects for some of the affected and have not enough data to know how long lived any immunity for those that have recovered may last.

    Not particularly encouraging for the more vulnerable groups – some of whom appear to be putting themselves in the path of increased risk regardless.

    I feel way less inclined to go out now than I did six weeks ago, which is ok as it isn’t coming as a particular surprise. I worry more for the mental health of those who may get knocked down and locked down again as their new recent freedoms become withdrawn.

    This evening’s announcements include reducing the largest groups to six people, requiring public meeting places to take the contact details of all attendees and the strengthening of legal enforcement with an increasing scale of fines for re-offenders.

    Whether this prevents those already flouting the rules from continuing to do so will remain to be seen – will those partying or just meeting with multiple households and without social distancing behind the closed doors of villages and towns across the country be so worried about the police knocking on their doors from now on that they cease this behaviour? Probably not. It will take actual infections and their consequences to occur to friends and family before these people begin to take responsibility for their actions.

    If anything the new restrictions will likely push people out of pubs and other more enforceable venues into their and other people’s homes as social venues.

    The Government are endeavouring to ramp up testing frequency and speed to result – the idea being that people could be tested on arrival at work or theatres, cinemas etc with those testing negative being admitted and allowed to mingle and interact as in pre Covid days while those who test positive are sent home to isolate from society until they are no longer considered a danger.

    Assuming this is possible it sounds like a great interim solution until a vaccine or treatment is available (next year at the earliest). It largely mitigates the above issues.

    Estimates that it would cost over £100 billion pounds still make it seem a better investment for businesses and society everywhere than HS2 for instance.

    The logistics of testing 10s, 100s or 1000s of people arriving at work or performance venues and managing them while they wait the 20 minutes or so for the results to appear, prior to admitting them or otherwise is an entirely different consideration – in many cases it would seem unlikely to be possible.

    Well, let’s hope this is the only necessary clamp down. Winter is coming…

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